Sylvia Necker

zeithistorikerin ::: architekturhistorikerin ::: klangwerkerin ::: ausstellungsmacherin :::
hamburg ::: frankfurt/m ::: münchen

stadt ::: raum ::: architektur ::: forschung ::: klang ::: material ::: geräusch :::

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Synagogues in Germany

Spatial variations and locations: Synagogues at the intersection of architecture, town and imagination, in: Simone Laessig/Miriam Ruerup (Hrsg.): Space and Spacelessness in German-Jewish History, New York/Oxford 2017, S. 264-294.

Aus der Verlagsankündiung (http://www.berghahnbooks.com/title/LaessigSpace):

“The range of approaches and the sheer breadth of spaces and texts treated here—synagogues and cemeteries, German landscapes, Freud and his reception, philanthropy, urban ghettos, photography, and museums—provide a compelling and rich window into Jewish spaces in their historical context.” · Barbara Mann, Jewish Theological Seminary of America

“This collection makes a convincing case for the application of ‘space’ as an analytic category for the study of minorities in European society, affording new insights into the complexities and fluidities of intertwined and ‘entangled’ histories.” · Jonathan Skolnik, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

What makes a space Jewish? This wide-ranging volume revisits literal as well as metaphorical spaces in modern German history to examine the ways in which Jewishness has been attributed to them both within and outside of Jewish communities, and what the implications have been across different eras and social contexts. Working from an expansive concept of “the spatial,” these contributions look not only at physical sites but at professional, political, institutional, and imaginative realms, as well as historical Jewish experiences of spacelessness. Together, they encompass spaces as varied as early modern print shops and Weimar cinema, always pointing to the complex intertwining of German and Jewish identity.